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Start Seeing Eagles description and how to help in 2014

June, 2014

Congrats and huge thank you's to all our donors and fundraisers for two VERY SUCCESSFUL FUNDRAISERS!

**Babies Gone Wild: Seeing Eagles!** raised $19,000!

**Give Local DeKalb County** raised $23,000!

**Many THANKS TO COMED for their $5,000 donation towards the new Eagle Enclosure!

Here's a drawing of the new EAGLE ENCLOSURE you all have made possible!

May 6, 2014

Give Local DeKalb County 24 Hour Fundraiser!! Support local DeKalb Charities like Oaken Acres on May 6th! Click here to donate to Oaken Acres on May 6th!

For more information on this event, read the FAQ HERE.

Ongoing 2014

Flower Power BULBS FOR BABIES campaign. Go to FlowerPowerFundraising.com
and choose OakenAcres!

Shop on Amazon? Use smile.amazon.com. Choose Oaken Acres Wildlife Center!

July 2014

OPEN HOUSE! **By Invitation Only** All Donors will recieve an invitation to the summer Open House! Haven't donated? Not on our mailing list? See our donor page to find out how!!

August 3, 2014

Elwood House, Come and visit with some of out ambassador animals including birds of prey!

August 7, 2014

YUM – Culver's in Sycamore – Visit with Vinnie the Vulture!! Come and have dinner with Vinnie from 5 to 8 pm on August 7th and part of the proceeds will go to help Oaken Acres! A display of the new Eagle Enclosure will also be on hand.

October 25th and 26th, 2014

Pumpkin Fesival, Downtown Sycamore. Booth in front of Taxco – Special appearances by our birds of prey!!

Summer, 2014
 
Oaken Acres Wildlife Center Needs Volunteers
 
Working with orphaned wildlife takes a special person. And Oaken Acres Wildlife Center in rural Sycamore is looking for some of those special people for the 2014 “baby season.”
 
Baby season at Oaken Acres means the time between May 1 and August 1 when it receives about 85% of all the animals it cares for each year. This busy time is when most of the wild babies are born and sometimes orphaned due to mothers being hit by cars or trapped in homes and not reunited with their babies, nests disturbed by storms, pets and children, and numerous other tragedies that befall them.
 
Most volunteers will have hands-on opportunities that include feeding, cleaning, and food preparation. Non-animal opportunities, such as reception and phone answering, will also be available to handle hundreds of phone calls that Oaken Acres receives each season about orphans and nuisance wild animals.
 
By law, anyone working with wildlife must be at least 18 years of age. This is not for the faint of heart. Some animals come in badly injured and some animals must be euthanized due to the extent of their injuries or the type of disease they have contracted. But nearly two-thirds of the wild animals received at Oaken Acres will be successfully released, most before September.
 
If you are interested in being considered for a volunteer position, email Director of Operations Christy Gerbitz at info@oakenacres.org  with your name, phone number, email address and your area of interest – mammal babies, songbirds, office, construction and landscaping, or fundraising.  If you want to know more about Oaken Acres, please continue to explore our website – www.oakenacres.org – and get acquainted.
 
 

April – June, 2014
 
Spring Babies at Oaken Acres Wildlife Center
 
It’s that time again when baby wild animals and people come into contact with one another. From owlets and squirrels in early spring, followed by raccoons, opossums, waterfowl and songbirds, the transition from winter to summer brings the busiest season for wildlife and for Oaken Acres Wildlife Center in rural Sycamore, Illinois.
 
This year, with the closing of the wildlife nursery at TAILS Humane Society, Oaken Acres will be the only wildlife center in DeKalb County. Here are a few tips to make life easier for all of us – wild babies and their moms, rescuers, and the staff at Oaken Acres.
 
First, unless an animal is obviously injured or orphaned, leave it alone until you get advice from a wildlife professional. There is a page on the Oaken Acres website that details what to do when you find a wild animal that may be in need of help.
 
Second, be certain it needs to rescued BEFORE picking it up. While most wild mothers do accept their babies back after being touched by people, it’s always better for them to stay in the wild if at all possible. An Oaken Acres staff member can advise you on the proper method of capture and transportation IF the animal needs to be rescued.
 
Third, until our baby season is in full swing, an appointment is necessary for bringing us an animal. After May 1, Oaken Acres will accept injured or orphaned wildlife from 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
 
Fourth, please keep your cat(s) indoors especially during the spring when wild babies are most vulnerable. The most recent reputable study of cat predation on wildlife paints a bleak and cruel picture of the outcome for millions of wild animals – mostly babies – that are attacked by owned cats. The injuries are usually too severe for the wild babies to survive and they suffer terribly at the paws of roaming cats.
 
Fifth, if you have a problem with a nuisance wild animal – raccoon or squirrel nesting in your attic, foxes or coyotes being more visible during the warmer months, birds building nests in house vents or soffits – call Oaken Acres for a humane solution to these problems. Almost all nuisance wildlife agencies kill any animals they has been hired to remove. Methods that are legal for “dispatching” these animals include clubbing, drowning and suffocating. Most people, once they are made aware of this, will not resort to lethal methods. While humane methods may take a bit longer and require some accommodations, they’re usually almost no cost to the homeowner and they keep wild families together without the need for any of them to die.
 
Lastly, do not attempt to raise a wild orphan on your own. First, it’s illegal for anyone to possess a wild animal without the proper permits from state and/or federal agencies. Most importantly, wild animals are not like domestic pets. Each species needs specific care and most people are not equipped or able to provide the proper care to keep them alive, let alone raise them to be successfully released into the wild. This is not a good experience for your children since, if you try to do this, it will usually end with your children in tears when the tiny baby dies due to improper care. Oaken Acres has been raising orphaned wildlife for almost 30 years and releases most of its patients back to the wild where they belong.
 
To learn more about wildlife and Oaken Acres, please visit our website – www.oakenacres.org – and get acquainted. Make sure to click on the “I’ve found a baby animal” at the bottom of the page. If you need to bring us a wild animal, please call 815.895.9666.
 
Donating to Oaken Acres is easy. On our website, just click on the “DONATE” button or a check can be mailed to Oaken Acres at 12140 Aldrich Road, Sycamore, IL, 60178.

                                                                                        


 


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